School system seeks help from community with Purposity Holiday Angel Tree program

Fayette County Public Schools needs your help to grant the wishes of community members in need with their Purposity Holiday Angel Tree program.

Fayette County Public Schools needs your help to support community members who need it most. This year, they hope to make wishes come true again with their Purposity Holiday Angel Tree program.

The purpose of the Purposity Holiday Angel Tree program is to provide clothing, coats, shoes, personal hygiene items, and more. School counselors and social workers use Purposity to capture student needs and then inform the community to help meet those needs.

There are currently 650 essential needs posted on Purposity for more than 200 students of all ages at Fayette County schools. Items range in price, starting around $15 and up, with the average overall listing being $25.

Donors can find Fayette’s needs at www.purposity.com/@fcboe. You can scroll to find an item cost and student profile that works best, then with just one click fulfill a specific need, pay and it will be delivered safely to school for the family of the pupil. To fill a second need, click on the blue “Fayette County Public Schools” at the top to return to the main page and make a second selection.

Purposity is an Atlanta-based nonprofit whose mission is to connect those in need with those who can help and fulfill that mission that makes it easy for neighbors to help neighbors.

School systems across Georgia and the country use Purposity to help meet the needs of struggling students and their families who are struggling to make ends meet due to various issues such as illness, loss of income, change in family dynamics or disaster such as fire or weather-related damage. Pursosity uses vendors like Amazon, Target, and Walmart to meet needs demands with free shipping and no-cost for schools.

Since Purposity is a non-profit organization, all items purchased through the app are tax deductible and 100% of the item price goes towards paying for the student item.

Ryan H. Bowman