Summer Medical Program Creates Access for Latino Students

Under the eyes of the students, they understood everything, from the emergency room to the operating table. It gave them a taste of their own future in healthcare. “I want to become an ultrasound technician,” said intern Yahdira Hernandez. Betsy Tnorio, another intern, said, “I was really into healthcare and wanted to experiment.” It’s the same for Yazmin Islas, she said, “I wanted to see what it was like to be a doctor, like an everyday thing.” Twelve future seniors on the other side of the metro received practical training in different medical specialties. “Taking them back to the OR and getting them to grips with the equipment was really a highlight of the program for them,” said Selene Espinoza, CNA Director at CHI Health. But for these students, their passion for medicine is fueled by living in today’s society where representation as Latino is slim. “None of my family members in my entire family ever went to college had the opportunity to work in the medical field,” Hernandez said. She said growing up she knew English, but her family did not. “When my mom or my sister were pregnant, they had trouble understanding, and I always had to translate,” Hernandez said. Barriers, Espinoza said, still exist in health care, but this program wants to change that. them and lived their life experiences to let them know that they are welcome in our hospitals, that they are welcome in our schools and that they are very talented and very intelligent children,” she said. declared. field, it takes head on and urges companies to follow suit. “Going into the communities and engaging with the needs of the communities, and also being able to support their own internal employees like me, who can really relate to the culture of the community and speak their language,” he said. she declared. Espinoza said CHI Health and the Latino Center of the Midlands are passing the baton to the next generation of nurses, surgeons and doctors by giving them a head start. “Offer scholarships to students, they will complete a six-week CNA certification program at Metro once they get their state license, they will be offered employment, whether it’s a full-time or part-time within CHI Health,” she said.

Under the eyes of the students, they understood everything, from the emergency room to the operating table. It gave them a taste of their own future in healthcare.

“I want to become an ultrasound technician,” said intern Yahdira Hernandez.

Betsy Tnorio, another intern, said, “I was really into healthcare and wanted to experiment.”

It’s the same for Yazmin Islas, she says, “I wanted to see what it was like to be a doctor, as an everyday thing.”

Twelve future seniors on the other side of the metro received practical training in different medical specialties.

“Taking them back to the OR and getting them to grips with the equipment was really a highlight of the program for them,” said Selene Espinoza, CNA Director at CHI Health.

But for these students, their passion for medicine is fueled by living in today’s society where representation as Latino is slim.

“None of my family members in my entire family ever went to college had the opportunity to work in the medical field,” Hernandez said.

She said growing up she knew English, but her family did not.

“When my mom or my sister were pregnant, they had trouble understanding and then I always had to translate,” Hernandez said.

Barriers, Espinoza said, still exist in health care, but this program wants to change that.

“Someone who looks like them and who has gone through their life experiences to let them know that they are welcome in our hospitals, they are welcome in our schools and they are very talented and very intelligent children” , she said.

Espinoza said that by removing all barriers to diversify the field, she is taking it head on and urging companies to follow suit.

“Going into the communities and engaging with the needs of the communities, and also being able to support their own internal employees like me, who can really relate to the culture of the community and speak their language,” he said. she declared.

Espinoza said CHI Health and the Latino Center of the Midlands are passing the baton to the next generation of nurses, surgeons and doctors, giving them a head start.

“Offer scholarships to students, they will complete a six-week CNA certification program at Metro once they get their state license, they will be offered employment, whether it’s a full-time or part-time within CHI Health,” she said.

Ryan H. Bowman