The Johns Hopkins program saves money

The Community Aging in Place—Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) program developed at the university’s nursing school is designed to keep older adults who are frail, chronically ill, or unable to perform life activities in their homes by providing them with care and help from conventional health professionals – nurses, occupational therapists – but also from people capable of carrying out minor repairs at home.

John Hopkins’ CAPABLE program certainly seems capable of saving money.

The Community Aging in Place—Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) program developed at the university’s nursing school is designed to keep older adults who are frail, chronically ill, or unable to perform life activities home by providing them with care and help from conventional health professionals – nurses, occupational therapists – but also people who can do minor repairs at home, explains Sarah L. Szanton, dean of the school.

If a participant can’t stand long enough to prepare food or is no longer able to shovel snow, the program caters to those types of needs as well, she said. Unlike the All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly program, which sends health care providers to the seniors’ home, the CAPABLE program allows participants to continue to see their primary care physician and other members of their care team. care.

According to a study published in Health Affairs A few years ago. According to Genworth Financial, an insurance company, staying at home provides significant savings compared to the average monthly nursing home care cost of $8,821. That could add up quickly given that about 2 million Americans are in nursing homes and some of them might be better suited for home care.

Additionally, about 20 million people need more care than they receive at home because they have difficulty performing activities of daily living, Szanton says. “It might be difficult for them to take a shower or get out of the toilet,” she added. “Either they get help from a family member or they don’t. And, if they aren’t, many people sit in their chairs all day. I’ve had patients who crawled to their kitchens because it was the only way to get there.

Supportive home care is grossly underfunded, in part because Medicaid and Medicare policies are more focused on institutional care, Szanton says.

Ryan H. Bowman